We peaked early. Guadalupe Peak and the Salt Basin Dunes.

Hiking Guadalupe Peak

Spicy at the peak
Introducing Spicy the Coconut…at 8,749 feet

I have never been one for viewpoint hikes as I call them.  I want a waterfall or a river, a bubbling brook on my hikes.  I feel more peaceful by the water.  So last year when Michael asked me to hike up Mount St Helens I said no.  I laughed about it. Why would I hike up a mountain just to look down and barely see everything I saw on the way up?  But Michael is persistent.  He kept asking and he made a few promises so I relented.  Some of those promises were not kept.

mt st helens
Exact depiction of when we reached the summit of Mount St. Helens.

Okay so it was amazing.  Getting to the top was such a natural high we started talking about hiking another mountain in Oregon before we headed off in our RV.  We never did get a chance to hike that mountain and since I sprained my ankle the second week of our adventure we haven’t done much hiking at all in the last three and a half months.  Staying at Guadalupe Mountains National Park , next to the highest peak in Texas, gave us the opportunity to dust off the ole poles, put on the ole hiking boots and walk up a mountain.

We started the hike at 6:30 am wanting to beat the worst of the afternoon sun.  The first mile and a half of the hike is switchback after switchback going up a steep trail.  After about a 1/4 mile I wanted to stop and maybe cry.  It was early morning and the sun was already beating down on us.

Rvs from trail
View from first part of hike. In the middle of the picture there is a cluster of vehicles where we camped.

At one point in the hike Michael told me he wanted me in front because–

Mountain Lions go after the smallest and the ones at the back.  You’re both of those. 

In my head a dense fog had settled and this sounded appealing.  A mountain lion attack would mean that I wouldn’t have to finish the hike… or give up and look like a big baby.  I stayed in the back.  I daydreamed about turning into one of those big horned sheep that traverse the mountains as easily as a mountain lion would take me down.

michael and me 2michael and me 3

After the first two miles I felt like a new person.  Fresh air and exercise will do that, it’s just getting back in the groove I suppose.  And shade, there was a good amount of shade after that first horrible mile and a half.

At a round-trip of 8.4 miles and an elevation gain of about 3,000 feet the hike is considered strenuous. But after the beginning part is over it’s not that bad. It’s rocky most of the way and there are some steep drop offs in a few places but the views are excellent.

view of other mountain
View of other mountains from the trail.
the bridge
A nice bridge you get to cross.
peak campsite
This is around the three mile marker where the backcountry campsite is located. Only another mile to go.

looking down from the trail

Once you reach the peak at 8,749 feet you can sign the log book that’s up there. You can also read the entries that others have written in the last year. There is one that still stands out in my mind. It was dated February 14th and said- Always alone on Valentine’s Day.  I assume it was meant to be funny, otherwise AWWWWWWW….

view from the top
View of El Capitan from near the top of Guadalupe Peak
view from top 2
View from the top. It doesn’t get any better than this.

We had some food at the top and hung out with Spicy the Coconut. Spicy has been around since last Spring. I drew a face on him and then couldn’t bring myself to cut him open.  Months passed, his milk dried up and he joined us for the adventure. We had to economize and get rid of lots of stuff when we moved into the RV….  But we kept Spicy.  He sends postcards to my little brother. Oh, and if you’re wondering, he signed the log book too.

spicy and gizmo
Spicy and Gizmo at the old house in Portland
spicy and carrot friend
Spicy and one of his dapper friends.

 

The Salt Basin Dunes at Guadalupe Mountains National Park

We wanted to mention the Salt Basin Dunes because it was one of the highlights of our time at Guadalupe Mountains National Park.  The dunes were a 50 minute drive from Pine Springs Campground.  The area they cover is small compared to the dunes at White Sands National Monument (where we went next).  But we had them all to ourselves and instead of seeing human footprints everywhere we saw animal tracks racing up and down the dunes.  It was worth it for that reason alone.

sand dune tara hike
The hike out to the dunes
sand michael
Michael wearing his Lawrence of Arabia hat. I used to make fun of this. Now I realize I need one too.
weed
Michael takes beautiful pictures.

sand dunes weedy snad dunes weedy sand dune tara sand dunes

We went out to the dunes around 11:00am on a day where the high was in the 70’s.  It felt at least ten degrees warmer.  The hike from the parking lot is only a mile but take a lot of water if you ever go.  There’s no respite from the sun during the hike or on the dunes.

There are bathrooms and a picnic area at the start of the hike.

so funny
Michael is so funny. There was no hand sanitizer in the women’s restroom.

 

 

 

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6 thoughts on “We peaked early. Guadalupe Peak and the Salt Basin Dunes.”

  1. Beautiful! Good job on the hike! I am the world’s biggest wimp in the heat, I literally just wilt and cannot do it. Two summers ago I did a big dream trip to the American Southwest in July. I have never felt such heat before in my life. This post reminds me of a cool place I went to then – Coral Pink Sand Dunes Park near Kanab, UT. Its pretty close to the Grand Canyon North Rim so we stayed there for that but the park itself was really nice and different from the nearby scenery.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I can’t imagine doing this hike in July! There were people starting the hike as we were coming down around noon and we couldn’t imagine doing that either. Michael is really sensitive to the heat and I’m finding that in the desert I am too. Lol, probably most people are. It’s beautiful but I do miss those shady fairy tale hikes of the Pacific Northwest sometimes. We are heading to Utah in our travels at some point so we will check thise dunes out. Thanks for the tip!

      Like

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